The SFGI Blog

Get the latest news & information from San Francisco Gastroenterology

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Hemorrhoids are very common.  Reports suggest that up to 50 percent of the U.S. population have hemorrhoids by the age of 50.  Hemorrhoids refer to enlarged or inflamed veins located at the anal opening.  These veins can become irritated and bleed.  The most common symptoms of hemorrhoids include rectal bleeding, anal itchiness and pain particularly […]
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FightColorectalCancer.org is hosting a webinar in partnership with Colon Cancer Alliance to present the latest information regarding colorectal cancer. The webinar is for patients, caregivers, survivors and advocates to learn about colorectal cancer. The webinar will discuss the following: 2013 colorectal cancer discoveries Updates on FDA-approved medications Latest news in cancer research and care Sign […]
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Nearly 100 patients were surveyed for feedback on endoscopy and colonoscopy procedures. At San Francisco Gastroenterology, our goal is to make the experience as comfortable and painless as possible. The survey was all-inclusive, gathering feedback from not only our patients, but other doctors’ patients as well. View the comments and suggestions: “The entire staff were […]
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Dr. Farrell is currently attending a national GI Meeting, in Orlando, Florida  to introduce his new product, The Colon Vitamin. The Colon Vitamin is an over-the-counter supplement containing ingredients that have been shown in scientific studies to help prevent colon polyps. Colon polyps are a growth on the lining of the colon (large intestine), which […]
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Crohn’s disease is an autoimmune diseasethat causes chronic inflammation of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract.  The exact cause is not known, but contributing factors include family history and the environment. When a person with an inherited risk is exposed to an environmental trigger such as bacteria that can alter the intestinal microflora, diet, and smoking, the […]
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Some individuals have a reaction to gluten which is not an autoimmune or allergic response. These people experience distress when eating gluten containing foods and show improvement when following a gluten-free diet. This is generally defined as non-celiac gluten sensitivity or gluten intolerance. Non-celiac gluten sensitivity is clinically less severe than celiac disease. Gluten ingestion […]